Strengthening Families through Home Visiting

The Parent-Child Home Program Curriculum:
Builds Protective Factors Against Abuse and Neglect and Increases Positive Parenting
 

The table below outlines five protective factors that reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect and the corresponding Parent-Child Home Program Curriculum Inputs/Outputs. These five protective factors have been identified by the Strengthening Families National Network as factors that all effective child abuse prevention efforts should focus on developing in their work with families.

Protective Factor The Parent-Child Home Program: Inputs/Outputs
Knowledge of parenting and child development Home Visitors model positive parent-child interaction behaviors:

  • Over the two years of home visits, these parental behaviors (and others) develop or increase:
  • Parent gives child directions and encourages child to follow them
  • Parent works with child to perform age appropriate activities
  • Parent tries to converse with child
  • Parent shows warmth toward child
  • Parent responds verbally to child’s verbal or non-verbal requests for attention
  • Parent verbalizes approval and affection toward the child
  • Parent satisfies child’s needs, signaled verbally or non-verbally
  • Parent provides a verbal rationale for obedience
  • Parent comforts child
  • In an evaluation of Parent-Child Home Program sites in Seattle, parents progressed from average scoring between “Never” and “Sometimes” when they began the Program to average scoring between “Sometimes” and “Most of the time” at the end of the first program year.
  • At the end of the second program year, parents were scoring between “Most of the time” and “Always.”
Social Connections Intensity of the model

  • Minimum of 46 Home Visits each program year (92 over two-year period)
  • Two visits per week
    Parents build important social connections with Home Visitor and with community services:
  • Trust relationship that develops between parent and Home Visitor empowers parent to seek/follow-up on referrals to other services and join in community-based activities (story time at the library, etc.)
  • The Parent-Child Home Program Coordinator works with families to connect them to other community-based services, supports, and opportunities. Program staff also help families identify/register for the
    next best educational opportunity for their children, i.e. pre-K, Head Start.
  • Parent-Child Home Program sites are well-established partners in the
    communities they serve. In addition to providing referrals, many of our sites offer playgroups or other parenting support programs which create opportunities for program participants to have social interactions and build social connections.
Concrete support in times of need Intensity of the model

  • Minimum of 46 Home Visits year (92 over two year period)
  • Two visits per week
    The regular presence of well-trained, well-supervised Home Visitors provides a consistent support system.
    The Parent-Child Home Program Coordinator works with families to connect them to other community-based services, supports, and opportunities.
    The Parent-Child Home Program’s curriculum/design facilitates opportunities for meaningful relationships and support between the Home Visitor and the family.
Parental resilience Intensity of the model

  • Minimum of 46 Home Visits year (92 over two year period)
  • Two visits per week
    Promotes emotional well-being for both parent and child through positive interactions – reading, conversation, and play experiences.
    Facilitates opportunities for meaningful fellowship and support between the Home Visitor and the family.
Social and emotional competence of children Home visits focus on modeling for parents and child together activities that build and promote pro-social child behaviors:
Research on the Program demonstrates improvement in the following behaviors in participating children, including:

  • Cooperative with adults
  • Understanding and completing activities that are developmentally
    appropriate
  • Approaching play in a systematic way
  • Expressing strong positive or negative feelings appropriately
  • Moods are appropriate to situations
  • Demonstrates sharing and tolerates delays in having needs met
  • Smiles and laughs when involved in play activities
  • Initiates interaction or responds to others with little hesitation

Please download a copy of this research by clicking here